All posts filed under: Defeating Average

10 Tactics to Better Manage Your Energy and Time 

On Monday I talked about better managing your energy.  Below are my top 10 Tactical Ways I manage Energy and Time.  “Einstein is reported to have said that if he only had one hour to solve a problem he would spend 55 minutes defining the problem and the remaining 5 minutes solving it routinely.” Each Saturday morning for an HOUR (it’s a time I tend to be freshest) I re-organize my calendar for the next weeks ahead and ask myself:  Does this meeting serve my top 5 priorities this month, my team (direct team, boss and partner teams)?  How many mentor meetings do I have in the calendar? Optimal 2 per week.  How many peer collaboration meetings that provide me inspiration? Optimal 2-3 per week  I write a “Focus for the week” email to my team outlining our top 4-5 priorities for the week. They tell me it helps keep them on track and is a check for me against my responsibilities as a team leader.  I put my own oxygen mask on first. Starting …

Start by hitting it down the fairway

Even for one of the best golfers of all time, that was the advice he followed on the first hole. If you can hit it down the center of the fairway to start the final round, it makes everything else easier. He last won a major golf championship (of the years 4 big tournaments) over 10 years ago! This will go down as one of the greatest comebacks in sports history! Two things said about his performance: “I did all the small things right today. Small things lead to big things.” He used “controlled aggression in his approach.” Not too risky but leaning on his competitors. A couple of good lessons useful for all phases of performance. Defeat Average this week. Colin

Clear is kind, unclear is unkind

Tough conversations are critical to your success as a leader. It’s a combination of empathy, aligning on values and being courageous on a conversation. Brene Brown spoke to our company earlier this month and as she shared “Clear is kind, unclear is unkind.”  We often sugarcoat or give people half truths to make ourselves feel better when giving feedback. “Not getting clear with a colleague about your expectations because it feels too hard, yet holding them accountable or blaming them for not delivering is unkind.” Of course, you need to invest in the relationship and build trust to earn the right to give feedback. Be Clear. Highly recommend Brene Brown’s new book, Dare to Lead. Defeating the Average within. Colin