All posts filed under: Time Management

Question of the Decade

Saying 2020 has been a strange year is an understatement. When you are looking back from the eve of 2030, how do you want to look back on how you showed up in 2020? I will take it one step further for those who have kids. When your son or daughter while studying this strange year in school asks you, what did you do to secure my future in 2020, what will you say? It’s never been a more important time to think ahead into the future while standing firmly with both feet planted in the present moment. Wishing you a great week ahead. Defeating Average. Colin

How to build trust in meetings

Don’t waste people’s time. You will lose trust and it impacts your brand.  In the last month, I have been talking to a number of leaders on how to run productive meetings. One thing they all agreed on was it’s never been more important to use people’s time well.  People are stressed. They have less time. They need to focus on family and mental health.  What is the criteria for good meeting management: Set clear meeting agendas  Be clear on why you are holding the meeting and why people are there (include in the meeting invite) Tell people what you will talk about ahead of time and what the outcome of the meeting should be  Run the meeting on time and have a call to action in the last 5 minutes  Respect people’s time and do not run over. If you make people late for their next meeting they will blame you. 🙂 Defeating Average in meetings.  Colin

Win The Day

In a recent podcast (Finding Mastery with Dr. Michael Gervais), Cap Ripken Jr was asked what he focused on each day.  Calvin Ripken Jr., nicknamed “The Iron Man”, is a former major league baseball shortstop and third baseman who played 21 seasons for the Baltimore Orioles. Ripken holds the record for consecutive games played, 2,632, surpassing Lou Gehrig’s streak of 2,130 that had stood for 56 years and that many deemed unbreakable.  His answer “Win the day.” You can play the long game both with a great vision for your career and taking it one day at a time.  On a recent day during PTO, nothing was more important than lying down in the park and watching the sunset with my wife and daughter. Win the day.  Colin

You are about to gain momentum

Have you ever started something you thought was going to be fun and exciting and all of sudden you lose interest or momentum? I have. We all have.  I had an attendee of a talk ask recently:  “I used to be in really good shape and want to get back into the classes I took. Every time I think about getting started, I stall. How do you stick with it?” Accountability, Acceptance, and Gaining Momentum.  Everyone hits a pothole on the way to a goal or a full out wall. It’s ok. It’s how you recover and pull on the rope and climb over or walk around it.  In order to keep committed to a goal (working out, doing yoga, painting, reading, or any other hobby) you need three things.  Accountability  DWYSYWD (do what you say you will do) Have accountability partners that will keep you on target  Action: Create an accountability texting group Acceptance Think through the obstacles you are going to encounter, visualize your way through and you will be halfway to your goal  …

Why you should give your secret sauce away

After 10 years of selling, I had figured a few things out. I had a process I followed what was working. Like a good BBQ sauce, I felt I had a recipe that was successful. Then one day it stopped working. I hit the financial crisis in 2008 and the way companies were buying changed. I didn’t pivot fast enough and had a rough year.  I also didn’t put up my hand and ask for help. I went it alone.  What did I take away from that year? People didn’t want BBQ sauce anymore. They wanted almond butter and I didn’t have a recipe.  In addition, if I had brought my BBQ sauce to the potluck party earlier and shared while it was in style, others would have shared their recipes back. I may have avoided a big slide. What am I saying? The selling world is complex.  If you give your secret sauce or go to nuggets away freely you are likely to get five to ten in return.  Ones that will keep you on …

Crisis is Opportunity + 7 Recommendations

In turbulent times, having the right questions to ask yourself every morning is critical. This helps shift you into the right headspace. What I am excited about today? What could I be excited about today? What am I grateful for? What will bring me joy today? What is possible? As we all head into unprecedented times, we need to come together and support one another. Your family, your neighbor, your community. Top 7 Things I am thinking:   1. Prioritize – If it does not support my family, my friends, and community, my company, or bring me joy, I am cutting it out. 2. Rest / Recovery – With less movement and travel comes the opportunity to recharge. Sleep is where 90% of the body heals.  A good thing to be focused on right now. 3. Reconnect with your family – We are often “busy”. Now is the time to support one another, and where possible look eyeball to eyeball and help each other. 4. Breath – Whether being mindful or just slowing down and fully …

10 Questions to Get You Laser Focused for 2020!

“The power to question is the basis of all human progress.” Indira Gandhi (Third Prime Minister of India 1917-1984)   One of the things I love most about the turn of the year is the ability to look back and reflect on the accomplishments of the previous year while getting excited about all the experiences and potential of the year ahead.  I’ve been delving into the questions below for a number of years and they have helped me supercharge my goal planning process. Here is part 1 of the exercise: What did you love in 2019? What were some of your Magic Moments? What was magical and extraordinary? What did you accomplish in 2019? What are some of the things from 2019 that you want to duplicate in 2020 What did you hate in 2019? What do you not want to have happen again? What did you learn by going through these experiences? Why were they incredibly valuable? What decisions did you make in 2019 that were empowering for you? What were some of the …

How to fall in love with your abilities

“We can fall in love with our own abilities and our own potential, then choose to maximize those abilities.” – Bob Rotella, performance psychologist, New York Times Bestseller author Thanksgiving is always a good time to evaluate your progress in a year, surrounded by friends and family. We often focus on the endpoint, the results, instead of focusing on the journey and the abilities and skills that got us there. Taking time to reflect on how you have grown and how your best performances look and feel like, can often tell you more about where to focus next. In the spirit of incremental learning, take some time this week to answer these two questions: 1. What does it look and feel like when I perform at my best? 2.  What are two changes can I make in my daily routine to support performing at my best? Have a great Thanksgiving week. Defeating Average. Colin

Getting the toxins out

There are many types of toxins in our life. Expectations are a new one for me. Drugs, alcohol, too much social media are popular ones. I’ve definitely been working on reducing my social media and replacing it with reading a good ole fashion book. I’ve journaled the results and it’s clear – I sleep better when I cut social in half and read before sleep. Expectations  I have a list of work, family, personal project and health items I want to get done every day. I measure my “feeling of accomplishment” by how much I get done. When I measure against all 10-20 items daily against purely getting done, I would get an F. When I prioritize out of that list what is important, is usually boils down to 3-5. I’m not going to speak to prioritization in this post, but instead of reflecting. We spend 8-12+ hours per day working, doing. How much time do we spend reflecting pre and post doing on if we have used our time well? A few questions I …

Preparation – Be there before you arrive 

My running coach in high school 20+ years ago said if you invest time visualizing your race, you will have a much better chance of success than if you don’t.  I didn’t get it. Now I do.  I would show up to each race and experience a few obstacles for the first time, trying to handle them in high-stress moments in races lasting 60 to 120 seconds where 1-2 seconds were the difference between success and failure.  I finished 4th a lot! Would visualizing have made the difference between 4th (you’ll get them next year!) and a medal?  100 Percent How does that apply to presenting in a meeting? 1.  Drilling your content like going to practice every day is table stakes.  2. Testing yourself against different competitors will give you different feedback. Test your talk track and concepts through multiple people.  3. Visualize the process. From when you arrive at the event, to the warm-up to the race (or meeting) to how you want to feel during and after.  4. Define what success looks …